Is Your Profile Picture Scaring Prospective Clients Away?

Is your profile picture sending the wrong message

You know it when you see it. A bad profile picture…

Although increasingly LinkedIn seems to be becoming less professional, using it for business successfully means adhering to a few simple do’s and don’ts.

DON’T #1  Do Not Half Crop Someone Out Of Your Profile Picture

If you want to use that flattering picture from the Calgary Stampede, you can, as long as you have a professional Photoshop your photo.

Photoshopping can remove your ex out, his or her arm and the Stampede background and make it look like you were posing on a dark blue background screen like you did at picture day in elementary school.


Pose like it’s picture day. A plain background shot from your shoulders up should do the trick.

I recommend a professional photographer, but if that’s not in your budget you can just use a selfie stick.

With these three options for profile picture editing and capturing, there is no reason why you can’t have a professional, uncluttered photo for business use on social media.


DON’T #2: Show too much skin

This applies to the ladies more than the men.

I don’t often see men with their chests nearly bare in their profile pictures, but it does happen.

I am speaking specifically about the images where the choice of top does not leave a lot to the imagination.

That’s not exactly conducive to creating a  professional business image online, unless of course you’re a professional bikini model, in which case disregard this tip.


Remember that you’re being judged by your prospective client or boss.

Whether you think a ton of cleavage is fine is not the point. Put the ladies away for best results.

DON’T #3: Have A Ridiculously Outdated Profile Picture

I touched on this in another post about Spring Cleaning Your Social Media and it bears repeating.

You want to be recognizable, so if someone meets you in public, they’ll think “I know that lady from social media.” not “Who is this?”

A current profile image could be the difference between building or eroding trust.